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                           "Famous" Semantics Words
                                    2017- 2018
            
legerdemain       (lej-uhr-duh-MAYN)    n.    [<French]
             
                            sleight of hand; skill at juggling and magic tricks
           
                              The magician’s legerdemain included making a coworker
                              disappear from a enclosure.
                 
                             (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1953 and in Paideia
                              in 2003 - That’s Entertainment.  On the Colorado State Spelling
                              Bee written test in 1972 and 1985.)
 

lacteal       (lak-TEE-uhl)    adj.    [<Latin]
             
                      relating to milk
           
                      Liz was surprised to learn that her lacteal drink was made from soybeans.
                 
                         (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1962.)
   
lectern       (LEK-tuhrn)    n.    [<Latin]
             
                      a reading stand
           
                        Miguel clutched the lectern in an attempt to conceal his nervousness.
                 
                        (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1982.  On the City Written
                        
spelling test in 2018 and the Colorado State written test in 1984.)
  
viscount       (VY-kount)    n.    [<English<French<Latin]
             
                         a noble ranking below an earl and above a baron
           
                    The viscount had no children and was becoming desperate to have an heir.
                 
                             (First appeared in Paideia in 2000 - The Round Table.)
  
lugubrious       (luh-GOO-bree-uhs)    adj.    [<English<Latin]
             
                          expressive of grief or sorrow; very sad or mournful
           
                              The funeral director spoke in lugubrious tones as she explained
                               the arrangements.
                 
              (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1953.  First appeared in Paideia
              
in 2000 - Mood Swings and again in 2006 - Filed of Champions. On the Colorado
              
State Spelling Bee written test in 1965 and 1983.)
 
hemidemisemiquaver       (hem-ee-dem-ee-SEM-ee-kway-vuhr)   
                                               n.    [<English<Latin<Greek]
             
                                                 a sixty-fourth note
           
                          He told us that a hemidemisemiquaver is the British name for a
                          musical note having the time value of a sixty-fourth of a whole note.
 
chintz       (chints)    n.    [<Hindi]
             
                  a usually glazed cotton fabric printed with colorful designs
           
                       The photograph shows Grandma wearing a dress made of chintz.
                 
         (First appeared in Spell It! in 2007 - Words from Asian Languages.  "Chintz" is tied
          for the longest word having its letters in alphabetical order.  Others are "begins"
          and "almost."  From chintz
we get chintzy meaning gaudy, cheap, or stingy.)
 

solder       (SAW-duhr)    v.    [<English<French<Latin]
             
            to unite or join parts together by means of a melted metallic alloy
           
                 Jennifer’s class learned how to solder wires so they could
                    experiment with electric circuits.
                 
                         (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1953
                           and in Paideia in 2000 - The Ties That Bind.)
 
pridian       (PRID-ee-uhn)    adj.    [<Latin]
             
                  of or relating to a previous day or to yesterday; former
           
                       As the bills accumulated, Gina began to doubt her plan
                       to restore the Victorian mansion to its pridian glory.
                 
                        (First appeared in Paideia in 2004 - It’s about Time).
 
knoll       (nohl)    n.    [<English]
 
                  a small rounded hill; a mound
  
                   Danielle lay at the top of the grassy knoll to catch some rays.
    
             (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1953 and in Paideia in 1996 -
               What on Earth?  On the City Written spelling test in 1997 and 2000.)
 
plethora        (PLETH-uh-ruh)    n.    [<Greek]
  
                         an overabundance; an excess; profusion
  
                 The jury retired to consider the plethora of evidence presented in court.
  
                       (First appeared in Paideia in 2002 - Spelling Counts.)
  
grimthorpe        (GRIM-thohrp)    v.    [<English name]
    
                       to remodel an older building without proper knowledge
                       or care to retain its original quality and character
   
                          Lets change the zoning so that no one will grimthorpe the
                              oldest houses in our city.
    
          (A proper name that has become a verb, similar to Boycott.  Edmund Beckett
           first Baron Grimthorpe 1816-1905 was an English architect severely criticized
           for radical changes he made to St. Albans Cathedral.)
      

kepi      
(KAY-pee)    n.    [<French<German<Latin]
             
                  a military cap having a close-fitting band, a round
                  flat top sloping toward the front, and a visor
           
      In the foyer of the French embassy the is a statue of a soldier wearing a kepi.
                 
             (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1953 and in Paideia in 1996 -
               What on Earth?  On the City Written spelling test in 1997 and 2000.)
 
urisk       (UHR-isk)    n.    [<Scottish Gaelic]
             
                  a good-natured elf of Scottish folklore said to
                   frequent sequestered places and waterfalls
           
                   Legend has it the urisk would help farmers tend their fields
                   but was shy and avoided by people afraid of its appearance.
                 
                       (On the 2017 Colorado State Spelling Bee written test.)
 
canopy       (KAN-uh-pee)    n.    [<English<Latin<Greek]
  
                     a drapery over a bed; a cover; a roof-like projection
 
                          A canopy was erected in the back yard to shield
                          the party goers from the sun.
  
                (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1953 and again in 1977. 
                 First appeared in Paideia in 1995 - Air Travel, and again in 2005 -
                 English, Latin, & Greek II.)

  
canapé        (KAN-uh-pee)    n.    [<French]
    
                       a small piece of bread or a cracker spread with
                    spiced meat or cheese and served as an appetizer
   
                         The hostess served Aaron a salty canapé spread with caviar.

   
déjà vu        (day-zhaw-VOO)   n.    [<French]
 
                          the feeling that someone has seen or heard
                             something before
   
                        A nightmarish déjà vu hit us as we sat in on the conference.
    
                           (On the Scripps grade-specific list in 2018.)
     
déjà vu
oeuvre        (UHRV-ruh)    n.    [<French<Latin]
   
                        the lifework of a writer, artist, or composer
   
                 The poet won the award not for any particular work, but for his oeuvre.
    
                         (First appeared in Paideia in 1995 - The Printed Word.)
  
reticent        (RET-uh-suhnt)    adj.    [<Latin]
    
                        disinclined to speak; uncommunicative
   
                        Jordan is usually reticent until someone brings up politics
                          then you can’t shut him up.
    
               (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1986.  As a noun reticence
                appeared in Paideia in 1996 - Synonyms & Antonyms and again in 2001 -
                Watership Down).  On the City Written spelling test in 1972 and 2002.)
          
rhabdoid      
(RAB-doid)    adj.    [<Greek]
 
                         shaped like a rod
  
                   Rhabdoid tumors occur in the kidneys of children
                     and are treated with chemotherapy..
    
       (The winning word for Faith Baca, 8th grader at Rocky Mountain School of
        Expeditionary Learning when she won the 2017 Colorado State Spelling Bee. )


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