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                             "Famous" Semantics Words
                                    2016- 2017
            
renege       (ruh-NIG), (ree-NIG)    v.    [<Latin]
             
                      to break one’s word; to go back on a promise
           
                         Tammy’s uncle promised to pay her tuition but he had
                          to renege after he was laid off at work.
                         
                     (In card games like hearts or bridge when you have to follow suit by
                      playing a card from the suit that was led, you renege if you play a card
                      from a different suit even though you have a card in the suit that was led.
                      First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1953.)
        
conflagration       (kawn-fluh-GRAY-shuhn)    n.    [<Latin]
             
                                a large disastrous fire
           
                                 Sixty fire trucks were called in to battle the conflagration.
     
                        (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1966.  First appeared 
                         in Paideia in 1995 - Light and again in 2006 - Adversity & Calamity.)
  
coup       (koo)    n.    [<French]
             
                   a sudden successful action; a clever maneuver
           
                           The dictator was ousted by a military coup.
                  
             (First appeared in Paideia in 1995 - Government and again in 2004 - War & Peace.)
  
roux       (roo)    n.    [<French]
             
                  a mixture of flour and fat cooked sometimes until the
                  flour browns and used to thicken soups and sauces
           
                     After deglazing the pan with white wine, Graham added
                       a roux made of flour and butter.
                  
                     (First appeared in Paideia in 2000 - Colorific! 
                      On the City Written spelling test in 2003. )
   
moue      
(moo)    n.    [<French]
             
                     a little grimace; a pout
           
                     Joey made a moue to show that he didn’t expect to enjoy the occasion.
                
feckless       (FEK-luhs)    adj.    [<English]
           
                        weak; ineffective; irresponsible
           
                          Mort was worried that his long periods of unemployment would
                          make him look feckless when he applied for a job.
                  
                         (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1973.)
    
majuscule      
(MAJ-uh-skyool)    adj.    [<French<Latin]
          
                           written in capital letters
           
                  The principal always write her memos to teachers with majuscule script.
  
                 (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1981 and in Paideia in 1995 -
                  The Printed Word.  On the Colorado State Spelling Bee written test in 2001.
                  On the City Written spelling test in 2017.)
                    
antediluvian      
(an-tee-duh-LOOV-ee-uhn)    adj.    [<Latin]
              
                             very old; old-fashioned; literally, of the time
                             before the flood in the Bible
           
                         Concerning the right of women to earn equal pay, the court stated,
                          "It’s time we discard the antediluvian notions of the past concerning
                          women in the workplace."
                         
                              (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1956
                               and in Paideia in 2004 - It’s About Time.)
    
tonsillectomy       (tawn-suh-LEK-tuh-mee)    n.    [<Latin + <Greek]
     
                                 the surgical removal of the tonsils
           
                                   Helen’s sore throat was due to inflammation of her tonsils
                                   so the doctor performed a tonsillectomy.
                  
          The base word tonsils (a pair of oval masses of tissue at the back of the throat)
          contains one "l."  Other words pertaining to the tonsils contain 2 "l’s."  Examples:
    
                    tonsillitis  (inflammation of the tonsils)
                    tonsillotome  (the instrument used to remove the tonsils)
      
               (Tonsillectomy first appeared in Words of the Champions in 1953, tonsillitis
                 in 1963, and tonsillotome in 1980.  Tonsilitis first appeared in Paideia in 1996 -
                 Medical TermsTonsillectomy appeared on the Colorado State Spelling Bee
                 written test in 1976.)
      
aperitif       (uh-per-uh-TEEF)    n.    [<French]
             
                     a before-dinner alcoholic drink
           
                       As an aperitif, Mrs. Simon prefers a dry white wine.
                  
                     (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1973.  Appeared
                      on the Colorado State Spelling Bee written test in 2015.)
  
austere       (aw-STIR)    adj.    [<English<French<Latin<Greek]
             
                       stern and unyielding in appearance and manner
   
                           The substitute teacher was austere and humorless.
                    
                     (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1979 and in Paideia
                      in 1995 - Hard Words.  On the City Written Spelling Test in 1985
                      and the Colorado State Written Test in 1996.)
    
deflead       (dee-FLEED)    v.    [<English]
             
                       gotten rid of fleas
           
                       Logan’s mutt keeps scratching himself so they
                       took him to the vet to be deflead.
     
dagwood       (DAG-wuhd)    n.    [<name of a comic strip character]
             
                          a many layered sandwich
           
                            Jack was very hungry and ordered a dagwood for lunch.
                  
                     (From Dagwood Bumstead, character who made such sandwiches in the
                      comic strip Blondie by Chic Young, beginning in 1936.  On the City Written
                      Spelling Test in 2016.)
  
chartaceous       (kawr-TAY-shuhs)    adj.    [<Latin<Greek]
        
                              resembling paper; made of paper
        
                                  Andrew collected a handful of chartaceous dead leaves.
                  
                     (This word was misspelled by John Wickelgren of Hill Junior High School
                       when he finished in 2nd place in the 1983 Colorado State Spelling Bee.
                       First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1978.)
 
denizen       (DEN-uh-zuhn)    n.    [<English<French<Latin]
             
                       a dweller in a certain place or region
           
                          Melvin asked a local denizen for directions.
            
                       (First appeared in Words of the Champions in 1970 and Paideia in
                        1996 - What On Earth?  On the City Written spelling test in 2017
                        and the Colorado State Written Test in 1999.)
  
boondoggle       (BOON-dawg-uhl)    n.    [<coined in 1925 by Robert H.
                                                              Link, American scoutmaster]
             
                      an impractical or useless project wasteful of time and money
           
                                     Our science project never got off the ground and turned
                                       out to be a real boondoggle.
           
rebus       (REE-buhs)    n.    [<Latin]
             
                     a puzzle consisting of pictures or symbols combined
                      to suggest words or phrases
           
                       A popular game show required contestants to solve a rebus to win.
      
boutonniere       (boo-tuh-NIR)    n.    [<French]
             
                               a flower worn in a buttonhole
           
                                  The groom wore a sprig of orange blossom as a boutonniere.
                  
                                      (On the City Written Spelling Test in 1972.)
   
oenophile       (EEN-uh-fyl)    n.    [<Greek]
oenophilist       (ee-NAWF-uh-list)
     
                             a wine lover; a connoisseur of wine
           
                           Mr. Sanders, a true oenophile, spent $250 on a bottle of wine
                            at the restaurant tonight.
      
turophile       (TUHR-uh-fyl)    n.    [<Greek]
             
                         a cheese lover; a gourmet of cheese
           
                           The turophile warned us not to be beguiled by the low cost
                             of inferior processed cheese.
                  
                             (First appeared in Paideia in 1997 - What’s for Lunch? 
                               On the City Written Spelling Test in 2001.)
boondoggle       (BOON-dawg-uhl)    n.    [<coined in 1925 by Robert H.                                                              Link, American scoutmaster]                                     an impractical or useless project wasteful of time and money                                                  Our science project never got off the ground and turned                                       out to be a real boondoggle. boondoggle       (BOON-dawg-uhl)    n.    [<coined in 1925 by Robert H.                                                              Link, American scoutmaster]                                     an impractical or useless project wasteful of time and money                                                  Our science project never got off the ground and turned                                       out to be a real boondoggle.
boutonniere       (boo-tuh-NIR)    n.    [<French]                                              a flower worn in a buttonhole                                               The groom wore a sprig of orange blossom as a boutonniere.                                                          (On the City Written Spelling Test in 1972.)


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